Radical virtuosity : Ana Mendieta and the Black Atlantic (Book, 2019) [University of Louisville Libraries]
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Radical virtuosity : Ana Mendieta and the Black Atlantic

Author: Genevieve Hyacinthe
Publisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts : The MIT Press, [2019]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
The artist Ana Mendieta (1948-1985) is remembered as the creator of powerful works expressing a vibrant and unflinching second-wave feminist sensibility. In Radical Virtuosity, art historian Genevieve Hyacinthe offers a new view of Mendieta, connecting her innovative artwork to the art, cultural aesthetics and concerns, feminisms, and sociopolitical messages of the black Atlantic. Mendieta left Cuba as a preteen,  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Pictorial works
Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Hyacinthe, Genevieve.
Radical virtuosity
(OCoLC)1251758494
Named Person: Ana Mendieta; Ana Mendieta; Ana Mendieta; Ana Mendieta
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Genevieve Hyacinthe
ISBN: 9780262042703 0262042703
OCLC Number: 1073036111
Description: xii, 333 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction. Disappearance as sociopolitically intense Black Atlantic performativity ; Black Atlantic ritual gesture in red ; Intermediacy as innovation ; Black Atlantic collaboration from silence into speech ; West African earthworks and el monté: First look ; Black and Brown tree of life ; Brown performativity: Black Atlantic insider and other --
1. From Árbitra to Serio: Experiencing Mendieta with slow temporality and embodiment. Vitalism and temporal deceleration in Anima, Silueta de Cohetes, and Ñañigo Burial ; From Árbitra and the Organization of Excess to Serio feeling, embodiment, collective endurance ; Serio embodiment at Bear Mountain and Yágul --
2. Self-indoctrinating El Monté on American soil: Neo-Baroque devils and goddesses. Neo-Baroque blood sign ; Inner devils: Eleggúa and Little Diablito ; Eleggúa and Ixchel baptism in Iowa ; Trickster self-portraits: Hair, power, and spectrum gender performativity --
3. Built to outlast the earthwork standard. Clawing, breathing, and partially buried ; "Small Axe" ; Against ephemerality: Books and images as endurance ; Tending el monté as portable border and "That Little Bit of Earth..." --
Conclusion: El Monté feminism: The evolving self as Silueta expansion. Yemayá's shimmer ; From shimmery sheath to blade ; Race and copresencing with Yemayá and Ochun ; "Yemanja is the Gush of Spring. The Gush of the Spring is Yemanja..." ; Madrina's Blaze ; An el monté living on...
Responsibility: Genevieve Hyacinthe.

Abstract:

The artist Ana Mendieta (1948-1985) is remembered as the creator of powerful works expressing a vibrant and unflinching second-wave feminist sensibility. In Radical Virtuosity, art historian Genevieve Hyacinthe offers a new view of Mendieta, connecting her innovative artwork to the art, cultural aesthetics and concerns, feminisms, and sociopolitical messages of the black Atlantic. Mendieta left Cuba as a preteen, fleeing the Castro regime, and spent years in U.S. foster care. Her sense of exile, Hyacinthe argues, colors her work. Hyacinthe examines the development of Mendieta's performative artworks-particularly the Silueta series (1973-1985), which documented the silhouette of her body in the earth over time (a series "without end," Mendieta said)-and argues that these works were shaped by Mendieta's appropriation and reimagining of Afro-Cuban ritual. Mendieta's effort to create works that invited audience participation, Hyacinthe says, signals her interest in forging connections with the marginalized, particularly those of the black Atlantic and Global South. Hyacinthe describes the "counter entropy" of Mendieta's small-scale earthworks (contrasting them with more massive works created by Robert Smithson and other male artists); considers the resonance of Mendieta's work with the contemporary practices of black Atlantic female artists including Wangechi Mutu, Renee Green, and Damali Abrams; and connects Mendieta's artistic and political expressions to black Atlantic feminisms of such popular artists as Princess Nokia.
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